Union County, Ohio

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Union County, Ohio
Map
Map of Ohio highlighting Union County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded Template:AutoLink, Template:AutoLink
Seat Marysville
Largest city Marysville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

437 sq mi (1,132 km²)
437 sq mi (1,131 km²)
0 sq mi (1 km²), 0.08
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

40,909
94/sq mi (36/km²)
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website: www.co.union.oh.us/
Named for: formed from the union of parts of surrounding counties

Union County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. As of the 2000 census, the population was 40,909. Increasingly becoming more of a suburban county, the population was estimated at 47,234 in 2007 by the U.S. Census Bureau. Its county seat is Marysville[1] and its name is reflective of its origins, it being the union of pieces of Franklin, Delaware, Madison, and Logan Counties.[2]

This county is part of the Columbus Metropolitan Area in Central Ohio.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 437 square miles (1,132 km²).437 square miles (1,131 km²) of it is land and 0 square miles (1 km²) of it (0.08%) is water.

Adjacent counties

Economy

The largest industry sectors in Union County are agriculture, industrial and manufacturing, and research and development. The county sales tax is 6.75%, and the county typically has unemployment rates below the state and national averages.

Agriculture

Agriculture makes up a large portion of the county's economy. Of the county's 277,760 total acres, 230,720 are dedicated to agriculture.[3] In total, there were 1000 farms with annual revenue totaling $85 million in 2006.[4] Federal farm subsidies to Union County totaled $88 million between 1995-2006.[5] Western Union County sits on the edge of the northwest Ohio "wind belt," and has attracted interest from energy companies specializing in wind farms. Ohio produces in excess of five million bushels of corn per year, and contributes tremendously to regional ethanol production.[6]

There are numerous local family farms in Union County, including Mitchell's Farm, Littlefoot Family Farms, Detwiler Farm, Phelps Farm, Blue Spruce Farm and Nursery, Greenleaf Farm, Hickory Lane Farms, Thorne Briar Farm, Hoskins-Hamilton Farm, Hoffman Farm, and Wiley Farm, as well as agricultural services corporations like Ohigro. There is a Union County Farmer's Market.

Day Lay Egg Farms is an industrial farm with operations in the western part of the county. Select Sires, a bio-tech firm and a world leader in livestock reproductive services, is located in the southeastern part of the county. The Ohio State University operates an agricultural extension office in the central portion of the county. Hi-Q Egg Products is investing $80 million in a new industrial farm operation in the western part of the county.

A notable local area farmer is Jack Foust, who has spent more than half of a century in the agriculture industry. His cattle at the Mayflower Farm have produced world records, while he himself has publicly served in positions appointed by the United States Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland and Ohio Governor Richard Celeste. He has been chairman of the Union County Board of Elections, and is an inductee into the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame.[7]

Industrial

In 2007, the estimated value of manufacturing operations in the county was $3.52 billion.[3]

View of the Scotts Miracle Gro Corp. headquarters from U.S. Route 33.
View of the Marysville Auto Plant from U.S. Route 33.

It is the home to major corporations, including Scotts Miracle-Gro and Univenture. Major corporations operating regional facilities in the county include Honda of America, Goodyear/Veyance Technologies, Parker Hanifin, United Rotary Brush, and Invensys Climate Control. The Honda operation includes the Marysville Auto Plant. Other large companies located in the county include Sumitomo Electric Wiring Systems, Ray Lewis and Son, Velocys, MAI Manufacturing, NEX Transport, and Midwest Express, among others.

Between 2000-2007, Union County businesses were awarded $9.3 million in United States Department of Defense contracts. The companies receiving those contracts were the Electronic Services Agency, Parker Hanifin, United Rotary Brush, and Leo Berbee Bulb Company.[8]

Research and development

Union County is home to major research and development operations. Nestlé is located in Marysville, and in recent years improved their facilities with a modern, multi-million dollar makeover. Scotts Miracle Gro also has their R&D operations located on their corporate campus. The Transportation Research Center, a state of the art facility dedicated to transportation research, is located on the western county line.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
18201,996
18303,192Template:Val%
18408,422Template:Val%
185012,204Template:Val%
186016,507Template:Val%
187018,730Template:Val%
188022,375Template:Val%
189022,860Template:Val%
190022,342Template:Val%
191021,871Template:Val%
192020,918Template:Val%
193019,192Template:Val%
194020,012Template:Val%
195020,687Template:Val%
196022,853Template:Val%
197023,786Template:Val%
198029,536Template:Val%
199031,969Template:Val%
200040,909Template:Val%
Est. 200747,234Template:Val%
Population 1820-2007[4]

As of the census of 2000, there were 40,909 people, 14,346 households, and 10,888 families residing in the county. The population density was 94 people per square mile (36/km²). There were 15,217 housing units at an average density of 35 per square mile (13/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.25% White, 2.81% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 0.98% from two or more races. 0.76% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 14,346 households out of which 38.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.40% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.10% were non-families. 19.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 34.00% from 25 to 44, 21.20% from 45 to 64, and 9.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 91.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $51,743, and the median income for a family was $58,384. Males had a median income of $40,910 versus $27,405 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,577. About 3.60% of families and 4.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.30% of those under age 18 and 7.80% of those age 65 or over.

Government

The county receives its power through Ohio statute. It has three elected commissioners that serve four years, as well as an elected treasurer, auditor, recorder, coroner, clerk of courts, engineer, prosecuting attorney, sheriff, and judges. In 2007, the county had $112 million in assets, and revenues of $50 million.[3]

Politics

Union County is a Republican Party stronghold. Its strong Republican roots go back to the formation of the party in the 1800s following the collapse of the Whig Party, which had previously been the preferred party.

The county has supported the Republican party in each of the last 13 presidential elections.[9] In the last five presidential elections the Democratic candidate has never received more than 38% of the county's vote.[10]

As part of Ohio's 5th congressional district and Ohio's 15th congressional district it had been represented by Republicans for almost seventy years until the 2008 election, when Democrat Mary Jo Kilroy, won a close, disputed contest against Steve Stivers.[11]

The county is in the 83rd Ohio House district. In 2008, the Democrats failed to field a candidate and the seat was won by Republican freshman Dave Burke.[12] He was preceded by Tony Core, who left the legislature because of term limits.[13] Portions of U.S. Route 33 in the county are named for Ed Core, Tony's father.[14] The county is in the 26th Ohio Senate district, currently represented by Karen Gillmor, the wife of former U.S. Congressman Paul Gillmor.

Communities

Map of Union County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels

Cities

Villages

Townships

Unincorporated communities

Notable residents

References

External links

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